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Posts Tagged ‘words’

The boyfriend’s recent forays to school (he’s been on break) to work on his paper in peace have begun to put more of a schedule in my life. I didn’t appreciate that the first few days the alarm went off at 7:15, though. He went again today, and so I keep forgetting that it’s Saturday. This is another bank holiday weekend. What will we do this weekend? Gammagoochie is canceled and that sucks as I’d really wanted to see the Jooks of Kent. Still, I’m quite tired and we have to get up early tomorrow to go to the Chiswick boot sale, then around 3 my pilates/massage trade chick is coming over to give me my first private lesson so I want to be awake and ready to go. We have no coffee. This will be interesting!

Thursday, in place of regular LFGSS West drinks, we attended (me with 144 very successful tiny cookies) the birthday bash of one of the forum legends, Mr. 50/14 (Fiddy). It was awesome, dozens of forum-goers to celebrate one man’s birthday, cakes and at one point we thought the man himself was showing up so lit the 300+ candles, only to find out it wasn’t him. Had to light them again later, it was a major blaze! I met a lot of people I’d not met before but sort-of-knew and confirmed forum and real-life names of several I did.

And here’s another word for you:

Merriam-Webster’s
Word of the Day
May 2

gadzookery

\gad-ZOO-kuh-ree\

Meaning
British : the use of archaisms (as in a historical novel)

Example Sentence
Bridget’s novel, set in colonial Virginia, features an engaging and cohesive plot, but the dialogue contains so much gadzookery that it doesn’t sound realistic.

Did you know?

“Gadzooks . . . you astonish me!” cries Mr. Lenville in Charles Dickens’ Nicholas Nickleby. We won’t accuse Dickens of gadzookery (“the bane of historical fiction,” as historical novelist John Vernon called it in Newsday), because we assume people actually said “gadzooks” back in the 1830s. That mild oath is an old-fashioned euphemism, so it is thought, for “God’s hooks” (a reference, supposedly, to the nails of the Crucifixion). Today’s historical novelists must toe a fine line, avoiding expressions like “zounds” and “pshaw” and “tush” (“tushery” is a synonym of the newer “gadzookery,” which first cropped up in the 1950s), as well as “gadzooks,” while at the same time rejecting modern expressions such as “okay” and “nice.”

*Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.

But…but…I say “pshaw”!

And ooOOoooh! I just discovered that if I highlight what I want to make bold or italicize it wraps it in the code automatically! I ♥ you, WordPress!

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Words, Sexy Words

I love it when I discover new variants of fancy words I already know that describe things that can be said less fancily. The way this word hisses as you say it is really quite sexy. V words (victuals, voluptuous, virtuous, vespers) used to be my favorite, though I can see in them the seed of what now gets me going, the sibilance of the S sound. Maybe it was the combination of the two I liked so much.

Merriam-Webster’s
Word of the Day
March 12

acedia
\uh-SEE-dee-uh\ noun

Meaning
: apathy, boredom

Example Sentence
A restaurant reviewer in SF Weekly once described a brunch as “a stupefyingly lavish buffet spread that will do nothing to erase your acedia.”

Did you know?
“Acedia” comes from a combination of the negative prefix “a-” and the Greek noun “kēdos,” meaning “care, concern, or grief.” (The Greek word “akēdeia” became “acedia” in Late Latin, and that spelling was retained in English.) “Acedia” initially referred specifically to the “deadly sin” of sloth. It first appeared in print in English in 1607 describing ceremonies which could induce this sin in ministers and pastors, but that sense is now rare. “Acedia” now tends to be used more generally to simply imply a lack of interest or caring, although it sometimes still carries overtones of laziness.

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words words words words

Obviously, by now, I’m re-posting older stuff now, catching everyone back up on what’s been happening since the start of this adventure. The only thing you’ve missed so far is when we didn’t have water for three days.

Merriam-Webster’s
Word of the Day
December 12

hebetude

\HEB-uh-tood\
noun

Meaning
: lethargy, dullness

Example Sentence
The hebetude and ennui displayed by such bright students was just one sign that they were not being sufficiently challenged in their classes.

Did you know?
“Hebetude” usually suggests mental dullness, often marked by laziness or torpor. As such, it was a good word for one Queenslander correspondent, who wrote in a letter to the editor of the Weekend Australian of “an epidemic of hebetude among young people who … are placing too great a reliance on electronic devices to do their thinking and remembering.” “Hebetude” comes from Late Latin “hebetudo,” which means pretty much the same thing as our word. It is also closely related to the Latin word for “dull” — “hebes,” which has extended meanings such as “obtuse,” “doltish,” and “stupid.” Other “hebe-” words in English include “hebetudinous” (“marked by hebetude”) and “hebetate” (“to make dull”).

Boy do I have intimate knowledge of this word! Between bouts of mania in which I worry that I’ll get kicked out of the country the second I extend one little tendril looking for information on working here, I laze about and can’t think very well, either in English or in Spanish. Spanish might be coming along, I’m feeling a bit better and have mapped out where I can go three times next week for free Spanish classes at two libraries. I ought to look into the different tallers in town to see which one I’d prefer to take classes at come January. I’ll go to them and ask to do their entry questionnaire and speak to their director and see what they think. Never again do I want to be placed in a higher class than I am ready for, that was a waste of an entire weeks’ tuition.-

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